Professor Clare Tilbury

Biography

Clare Tilbury is a Professor in the School of Human Services and Social Work at Griffith University. Her research focuses on child protection systems, performance measurement, accountability, and racial disparities. She has led significant national child protection research projects and publishes extensively in Australian and international journals. Prior to entering academia in 2004, Clare worked for twenty years in child and family practice, policy, management, and research roles. She serves on government advisory bodies and the Boards of various community and professional organisations related to child and family wellbeing, socio-legal issues, and access and equity. She is a member of the Griffith Criminology Institute, Australasian Regional Editor for Child and Family Social Work, and Editorial Board member of Australian Social Work.

Abstract

Keeping children safe and settled: achieving placement stability in out-of-home care (Plenary: symposium)

Children develop and thrive when they live in stable home environments. This is especially critical for children in out-of-home care, who already face environmental and personal stressors. However, evidence shows that significant numbers of children in 2019 are still being moved around the system, putting their wellbeing at risk.

Rising numbers of children in out-of-home care, and concerns about their wellbeing, have led governments across Australia to introduce major reforms. In this reform environment it is essential we ensure that placement stability in out-of-home care remains a priority issue.

In this symposium we will briefly summarise recent research on placement stability and outline how this research is making a mark on policy and practice. We will identify approaches to improving stability such as SNAICC’s Family Matters Report Card and the Permanency Support Program in NSW. Speakers will highlight actions to improve the system for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people and the importance of using data to understand system dynamics and trends. The symposium will identify areas where we are not delivering on stability – and how we can achieve change.

The symposium panel of senior leaders has been chosen to reflect diverse perspectives and expertise from policy, practice, advocacy, research and implementation, as well as for their cross-jurisdictional experience.

CO-PRESENTERS:
– Natalie Lewis, CEO, Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Protection Peak
– Professor Claire Tilbury, School of Human Services and Social Work, Griffith University
– Deidre Mulkerin, Deputy Secretary, Commissioning, NSW Family and Community Services

Abstract-Plenary

Children develop and thrive when they live in stable home environments. This is especially critical for children in out-of-home care, who already face environmental and personal stressors. However, evidence shows that significant numbers of children in 2019 are still being moved around the system, putting their wellbeing at risk.

Rising numbers of children in out-of-home care, and concerns about their wellbeing, have led governments across Australia to introduce major reforms. In this reform environment it is essential we ensure that placement stability in out-of-home care remains a priority issue.

In this symposium we will briefly summarise recent research on placement stability and outline how this research is making a mark on policy and practice. We will identify approaches to improving stability such as SNAICC’s Family Matters Report Card and the Permanency Support Program in NSW. Speakers will highlight actions to improve the system for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people and the importance of using data to understand system dynamics and trends. The symposium will identify areas where we are not delivering on stability – and how we can achieve change.

The symposium panel of senior leaders has been chosen to reflect diverse perspectives and expertise from policy, practice, advocacy, research and implementation, as well as for their cross-jurisdictional experience.

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