Yvonne Karen Parry

Biography

Dr Parry’s research exists at the important intersection between nursing/public health and child protection. Yvonne’s research over the last decade has combined in-depth and extensive collaborative community based research, with quantitative data analysis and this work has also informed her quality teaching scholarship, interdisciplinary course development and policy submissions to professional accreditation organisations and governments. Dr Parry has made an outstanding contribution to the field of mixed methods research and child health and welfare, specifically vulnerable children, since she completed her PhD in 2012. She has research projects in child homelessness, Communities for Children evaluations, domestic violence impacts on families, and in the impact of disaster on families. Importantly a considerable component of her research is translating findings into appropriately developed education and training for service professionals including undergraduate health professionals. This is best demonstrated through her Office of Learning and Teaching grant that provides educational materials for allied health professionals throughout Australia who are working with children under five, and in the student led clinic she developed that provides services to families on the margins. She teaches research methods to community organisations, tertiary students and has presented her mixed methods research internationally.

Abstract

Mixed method research designs are used to answer “the what and how” questions of a research project. Further, mixed methods provides a basis for a more comprehensive understanding of the interactions between these categories and patterns of health, welfare and educational access and service delivery. Whilst the quantitative data can describe the situation, such as attendances at a service, it fails to explore the deeper needs of a population group, or explain the influences behind some aspects of service use. Mixed methods research processes provides information, data, resources and process that enables deeper understandings of complex factors involved in providing services to children. Additionally, mixed methods research design have the potential to provide an evidence-informed understandings of public policy issues.
Key learning outcomes
This workshop uses acute care and community based service and program evaluations, to outline the uses of mixed methods e.g. the processes of the theoretical bases, literature review, program review, and application of theoretical and literature components to service provision will be provided.
Following this interactive workshop the participants will have knowledge on:
• Appropriate uses of mixed methods
• Sequential and concurrent mixed methods
• The application of mixed methods to acute care service provision and community care program evaluations
• The appropriate techniques for mixed method analysis and results.Along with an exploration of appropriate statistical analysis and qualitative analysis techniques entailed in the evaluation of services for research projects focused on practical applications and the transfer of knowledge into nursing education.

Abstract

Research shows that children living in poverty are exposed to higher levels of stress and this interferes with their ability to learn and meet developmental milestones (Margolin and Gordis 2004, Suor, Sturge-Apple et al. 2015). Furthermore, the differences in cognitive ability are evident at aged four (Margolin and Gordis 2004, Suor, Sturge-Apple et al. 2015). Additionally, research and systematic literature reviews highlight the importance of engaging fathers antenatally to improve longer term childhood outcomes (Bronte-Tinkew, Ryan et al. 2007, Committee 2014, Fletcher, May et al. 2014). The Murraylands Rural Region of South Australia has been recognised as an area where children experience high rates of developmental vulnerability (Australian Early Development Census 2015).
Traditionally, antenatal education has not specifically targeted fatherhood and father’s needs. The positive impact of fathers on children’s cognitive, linguistic and physical development is compelling (Fletcher, May et al. 2014). The CfC Murraylands Antenatal education classes provides specific sessions for expectant father participation. These separate meetings invite fathers to explore their roles and parenthood in a male context. The results of research on the two of the programs offered by ac.care Murraylands, Communities for Children, found that Dads engaged positively as parents after completing the Antenatal Dads program (for Dads 0 to birth) or the Beyond Kayaking (for Dads 0 to 16 years) programs. The results also found the programs are cultural inclusive and decrease risks for vulnerable rural infants and children.

Abstract

The National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children outlines the importance of Child Aware Approaches for community service providers. In accordance with CAA principles the SA government changed the homelessness services sector policy and practices to incorporate CAA modes of operation. For the homelessness sector this has entailed a range of changes. This session addresses ‘Does policy really drive what we do or is it something else? Does it really influence service delivery?’
The changes are required in recognition of the risks and vulnerabilities faced by children in homeless families and the need to change policy to improve sector practices and minimise the risk.
Internationally, the fastest growing area of homelessness is homeless families and often services are ill-equipped to deal with the needs of homeless. Children living in homelessness face multiple adversities related to inadequate food, nutrition, poverty and lack of parental knowledge of child development.
Research conducted in this area has highlighted the gaps in the policy implementation, profession practice of front-line workers, and how these have been addressed.
This Policy Think Space Session will provide a discussion based on the translation of this major policy change into practice, the identification of remaining policy to practice gaps and the implementation processes. A research evaluation of policy change has provided insight into implementation gaps. The format used in this Policy Think Space Session will allow the interactive, practical implementation of CAA policy change to be applied to other services and areas of CAA policy and practice.
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